Jules Moigniez

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(French, 1835-1894)

Moigniez was born at Senlis sur l'Oise, but made Paris his home until the last year or two of his life.  He studied there under the sculptor Paul Comolera, and exhibited his work for the first time at the Exposition Universelle of 1855.  He became a regular contributor to the Salon until his retirement in 1892.  Moignez's work was highly appreciated in France, America, and also in England.  He received a medal at the Great Exhibition held in London in 1862, and it is known that over half his work was exported abroad.

 

The popularity of Moigniez's work in his lifetime is understandable.  His compositions were decorative, in no way likely to offend the squeamish.  Purely visual as seen in nature, they were easily understood.  In some of his sculptures of animals, particularly dogs, he is derivative from Mene, but the crispness and general excellence of the founding and finishing saves many from mediocrity.  The casting, which is invariably excellent, was in the hands of his father, who started a foundry for this purpose in 1857.  Originally a metal gilder, he experimented with a variety of  patinations, including gilding and the many shades of golden bronze that were so successful and are particular to Moigniez's work.

 

In his premier choice of subject, the sculpture of birds, Moigniez excelled.  He developed an individuality in sculptural form reminiscent  of the exotic splendor of the subjects created in the paintings of de Hondecoeter, Casteels and Snyders, who undoubtedly inspired his interest.  Moigniez's elegant interpretations of the many varieties of waders, game, and other birds have earned him his place in this field of anamalier sculpture.


Bassett
Bronze
21.5" x 3" x 7"
SOLD

Billy Goat and Nanny
Bronze
11.5" x 10"
SOLD

Carte de Visite Tray
Bronze
12" x 10"
SOLD

Game Compote
Bronze
7" x 9" x 6.5"
SOLD